Counterfeit airbags: an update for Tucson, Arizona drivers

Have you been following the news stories lately about the dangerous counterfeit air bags that have made their way into the U.S.?  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued an alert last week urging consumers to check to see if any counterfeit air bags were installed in your vehicles.

A large number of air bags were falsely manufactured in China and stamped with actual automotive dealership emblems to make them identical to real air bags.  A Chinese citizen named Dai Zhensong then sold these air bags on an auto parts website for much cheaper than legitimate air bags are valued at.  Independent body shops across the U.S. have purchased these air bags to use on customers’ cars as a cheaper alternative to original equipment manufactured air bags.

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Counterfeit air bags: could your vehicle have one?

We all know that air bags are imperative for preventing serious injuries and fatalities in car crashes, but what if your air bag is a fake?  Have you had an air bag replaced in the last three years?  Then read on for some crucial information about dangerous counterfeit air bags that have made their way into the U.S. market.

Here’s the story: a large number of air bags were falsely manufactured in China and stamped with actual automotive dealership emblems to make them identical to real air bags.  A Chinese citizen named Dai Zhensong then sold these air bags on an auto parts website for much cheaper than legitimate air bags are valued at.  Body shops across the U.S. have purchased these air bags to use on customers’ cars as a cheaper alternative to original equipment manufactured air bags.  Tests have revealed that these counterfeit air bags are extremely dangerous, because they do not deploy and some have even been found to expel metal shrapnel and flames in a collision.  Dai Zhensong was sentenced in February to 37 months in prison for his offense.

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